Plantar Fasciitis - Put the pain away, Fly freely with your healthy feet

Plantar Fasciitis - Put the pain away, Fly freely with your healthy feet

Health affairs are always the priority in our life. And we have a big concern about foot's problems, and today we want to bring up one of the major foot issues, Plantar Fasciitis. Let's dive into the details, shall we?

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is pain on the bottom of your foot, around your heel and arch. You can usually ease the pain yourself but see a GP if it does not improve within 2 weeks.

Diagnosis & Symptoms

The main symptom of plantar fasciitis is pain on the bottom of your foot, around your heel and arch.

It's more likely to be plantar fasciitis if:

  • the pain is much worse when you start walking after sleeping or resting
  • the pain feels better during exercise, but returns after resting
  • it's difficult to raise your toes off the floor

If none of these above that you are experienced, there might be other foot's problems. See more below!

>> Arch Pain - Easy to care for yourself!

>> Bunions - Everything you need to know!

>> Turf toe - Treat your vulnerable big toe today!

Reasons

Plantar fasciitis is caused by straining the part of your foot that connects your heel bone to your toes (plantar fascia).

You may be more likely to get plantar fasciitis if you:

  • are 40 - 60 years of age
  • recently exercised on hard surfaces
  • exercise with a tight calf or heel
  • overstretch the sole of your foot during exercise
  • recently started doing a lot more walking, running or standing up
  • wear unsupported shoes with poor cushioning or foot arch support
  • are very overweight

Treatments

Consider taking some of these actions below to provide self-treatment:
  • rest and raise your foot on a stool whenever you can

  • put an ice pack in a towel on the painful area for up to 20 minutes every 2 - 3 hours

  • wear orthopedic shoes with cushioned heels plantar fasciitis support, and good arch support

  • use orthotic insoles or heel pads for foot support

  • try regular gentle stretching exercises to relieve pain

  • try foot support exercises that do not put pressure on your feet, such as swimming

  • take painkillers like paracetamol and ibuprofen

  • try to lose weight if you’re overweight

Besides, these are some cautions that you must not do:

  • do not take ibuprofen for the first 48 hours

  • do not walk or stand for long periods

  • do not wear high heels or tight pointy shoes

  • do not wear flip-flops or backless slippers

  • do not walk barefoot on hard surfaces

Orthopedic Shoes Suggestion

Orthopedic shoes usually appear with removable orthotic support insoles, ideally made for pain relief, arch support, posture correction, bunion correction, plantar fasciitis... We recommend some of our Orthopedic Shoes that are highly recommended by our Podiatrists team below, feel free to click & pick your preference!

 

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